Wednesday, September 6, 2017

GARDENING AFTER HOUSTON'S HURRICANE HARVEY

Draining the Opuntia Pot

There are several ways to lose plants along the Texas coast. As a tropical gardener, FROSTS & FREEZES top the catastrophe list.

DROUGHT is second on the list followed by HEAT WAVES.
HIGH WINDS are always a concern for the canopy of trees so they're ranked number four.
WATER STANDING IN THE GARDEN FOR FIVE DAYS IS A NEW EXPERIENCE.
I have many types of plants besides tropicals, so let me share my newest learning curve.
As you might gather from the above image, this agave did NOT like the flood. We shall see about the rest in the weeks to come.
The herb garden was hit and miss. The lavenders are of course unhappy as are the rosemary.
Their thin, well-draining raised beds might save them in the long run. But it will be nip and tuck.

 Thyme abhors overwatering. And yet... it looks like its going to make it. I love having thyme in the garden. I wish I had more. ha ha

The zinnia bed was up near the street and literally washed away, but these Rudbeckias (though a bit wilted) look like they are going to recover. These are my favorite flowers and a nice gift from my gardening friend in Katy, Texas.
 They are the bright spot after the hurricane.

It is simply bizarre to see plants wilt after a flood. Usually I associate this behavior with drought conditions. This was a clerodendrum.

THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT TROPICAL GARDENING IS THIS...IT SEEMS NO AMOUNT OF WATER IS TOO MUCH FOR MOST TROPICAL PLANTS!

The gingers did fine!

The banana trees are reaching towards heaven and looking quite majestic.

I use pothos ivy as a ground cover in many parts of the shade garden. I can't believe this plant can sit in water for days and remain healthy. And yet...here they are along with purple Zebrinas! 

Wind gusts topped 45 mph from Harvey. My windmill palm is now leaning and the roots seem very weak from the many days of water-logged soil. It might be time to sing "Let it Go".
So long windmill palm. 

On the other hand,
these Chinese Fan Palms fared very well throughout the ordeal.

Our native Texas trees like this redbud in front of our home have adapted to the local climate for  thousands of years. Dealing with floods is in their survival guide.


I'll end with a view of my favorite tree, the live oak. Its nickname is the Hurricane Tree since it has a low, streamlined profile that can take heavy winds. This one is in a neighbor's yard, but I wish it was in mine!
*****
As I end this post, our first cool front has arrived and its cool for the first time in over three months. THE GARDEN IS CALLING AND I MUST GO!!!
Texas gardeners look forward to this first cool day like most people look forward to Christmas.

Merry Christmas!
David/:0)
RIDICULOUS FOOT NOTE:
Same species, same soil type, same light conditions, and same location...but not the same ending.
(Gardening is full of mysteries)










4 comments:

  1. LOL Yes, same deal here for the most part. Except for the lantana which likes it drier, everything 'tropical' has thrived. Some things didn't even bat an eye. Glad you made it out ok, too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm glad so much of your garden came through the storm okay!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Incredible! This blog looks just like my old one!
    It's on a totally different subject but it has pretty
    much the same layout and design. Outstanding choice of colors!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Glad to see glad to see your garden is recuperating. Tonight we're bracing for Irma. I'm not sure what will be left of my garden after Irma whips through it for 10 to 12 hours.

    ReplyDelete

I always appreciate your comments & questions! Happy Gardening from David/ Tropical Texana

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